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posh crystal cabs we will transfer from any UK destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports and sea ports in the British Isles; UK SEAPORTS

Southampton , Portsmouth, Dover, Harwich, Tilbury, London Tower Bridge, London , Newcastle and Liverpool.

Bristol Cardiff 

posh crystal cabs can provide transfers from your home or business to any airport in the uk . Posh Crystal cabs North Walsham Aylsham are a Norfolk based Cab We provied 

ALL UK AIRPORTS

Heathrow, Gatwick, London City, Stansted, Luton, Southend, Birmingham,Liverpool and Manchester.Leeds 

LOCAL TAXIS


OUR SERVICE

posh crystal cabs can provide transfers from your home or business to any airport in the uk . Posh Crystal cabs North Walsham Aylsham are a Norfolk based Cab We provied 

Local runs

North Walsham Aylsham Norwich Cromer Wroxham Holt Gt Yarmouth Mundesley Bacton

 

ALL UK AIRPORTS

Heathrow, Gatwick, London City, Stansted, Luton, Southend, Birmingham,Liverpool and Manchester.Leeds Blackpool

 

UK SEAPORTS

Southampton , Portsmouth, Dover, Harwich, Tilbury, London Tower Bridge, London , Newcastle and Liverpool.

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Charlie Pride - Crystal Chandeliers

Buddy Holly - Everyday

BRIAN HYLAND GINNY COME LATELY

Blackpool is a seaside resort on the Irish Sea coast of England. It's known for Blackpool Pleasure Beach, an old-school amusement park with vintage wooden roller coasters. Built in 1894, the landmark Blackpool Tower houses a circus, a glass viewing platform and the Tower Ballroom, where dancers twirl to the music of a Wurlitzer organ. Blackpool Illuminations is an annual light show along the Promenade.

Have you seen them? The sort of spectacle that everyone should see at least once, Blackpool Illuminations enthral millions of visitors every year. The greatest free light show on earth has been a major part of Blackpool’s attraction since 1879 when they were described as ‘Artificial Sunshine’.
The annual Festival of Light compliments the traditional Illuminations with a contemporary look at the concept of light and art working together to create entertainment. You can even get involved with some of the interactive installations designed to amuse and provoke thought.
The “Big Switch On” is the brightest night, when the switch is pulled to create the magic and excitement that Blackpool is known for.Opening TimesBlackpool Illuminations 2020

04 Sep 2020 - 08 Nov 2020

Blackpool Tower is a tourist attraction in Blackpool, Lancashire, England, which was opened to the public on 14 May 1894. When completed Blackpool Tower was the tallest man made structure in the British Empire

380ft into the sky to the top of The Blackpool Tower and experience the thrilling SkyWalk. Walk out if you dare onto the five centimetre thick glass viewing platform, where you can look out into the Irish Sea and see the famous Blackpool Promenade below you. See the North West of England spread out before you with views over Bowland, up to the Lake District and on a clear day down to Liverpool and across to the Isle of Man

Blackpools

The roller coaster opened as the Pepsi Max Big One on 28 May 1994. It was both the tallest and steepest roller coaster in the world when it debuted, but it was not the fastest. The Big One's height record was surpassed by Fujiyama in July 1996, but it remains the tallest roller coaster in the UK as well as the country's second-fastest.  The Big One was also one of the longest, as its out-and-back roller coaster layout measures nearly a mile in length at 5.497 feet (1,675 m). Its top speed of 74 mph (119 km/h) in 1994.

The Blackpool Tramway runs from Blackpool to Fleetwood on the Fylde Coast in LancashireEngland. The line dates back to 1885 and is one of the oldest electric tramways in the world. It is operated by Blackpool Transport and runs for 11 miles (18 km). It carried 5.2 million passengers in the 2018/19 financial year.

It is the last surviving first-generation tramway in the United Kingdom, though the majority of services on the line have since 2012 been operated by a fleet of modern Flexity 2 trams. A 'heritage service' using the traditional trams operates on Bank Holidays, select weekdays and weekends from January to December, as well as during the Blackpool Illuminations.

The tramway has a varied fleet. The standard livery introduced on the Flexity 2 trams has purple fronts, with white sides, black window frames and a purple criss-cross pattern on the lower sides. The heritage tramcars mostly use the traditional green and cream livery of BTS in various styles from the 1930s to the 1990s, with some cars using red and cream/ white liveries and other assorted liveries. Some trams carry colourful all-over advertisements.]

The Rail Vehicle Accessibility Regulations have seen the fleet divided into three parts: the 'A' fleet of 18 Flexity 2 trams, fully compliant with the RVAR; the fleet of 9 converted double-deck trams that have partial exemption through partial conversion to improve accessibility; and the  fleet, the exempt heritage fleet.


Mundesley is a coastal village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 20.3 miles (32.7 km) north-north east of Norwich, 7.3 miles (11.7 km) south east of Cromer and 136 miles (219 km) north east of London. The village lies 5.6 miles (9.0 km) north-north east of the town of North Walsham. The nearest railway station is at North Walsham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich Airport. The village sits astride the B1159 coast road that links Cromer and Caister-on-Sea, and is at the eastern end of the B1145 a route which runs between King's Lynn and Mundesley. Mundesley is within the Norfolk Coast AONB. It has a resident population of around 2,695 (parish, 2001 census), measured at 2,758 in the 2011 Census The River Mun or Mundesley Beck flows into the sea here

Mundesley has an entry in the Domesday Book of 1085 with the town's name recorded as Muleslai. The main landholder was William de Warenne, and the survey also lists a church.

Second World War

The Mundesley war memorial is dedicated to sailors and volunteers who cleared the North Sea of mines during and after the Second World War. Next to the church is a World War II gun emplacement, which now stands near the edge of the cliff, due to coastal erosion.

An electoral ward in the same name exists. This ward includes Bacton and had had total population at the 2011 Census of 4,191.

Mundesley is a popular seaside holiday destination due to its sandy beaches and has a number of holiday chalet and caravan parks and hotels. Just to the south of Mundesley on the road to Paston is a popular windmill, Stow Mill. The village was a popular seaside resort in Victorian times, benefiting from its own railway station which closed in 1964.

Golf course

The village has an historic golf course in the Mun Valley, designed with the help of six-times Open Champion Harry Vardon. Vardon convalesced at the nearby sanitorium while recovering from tuberculosis and his association with the course spanned many years. It is said that he scored his only hole-in-one on what is now the sixth. The course was reduced to nine holes when land was required for wartime farming, which was very important in that era

The village centre offers shops including a butchers, florists, arts and crafts, chemist and convenience stores. Mundesley also has its own medical centre and primary school. There is an adventure island crazy golf park close to the seafront. There is a very small maritime museum which is also the local lookout of the National Coastwatch Institution, a charity offering 365 days lookout in over 50 stations along the British coast.

There are three pubs in Mundesley. One of the oldest is the Ship Inn situated on the sea front. Its first landlord is listed as being Paul Harrison in 1836. Its flint construction is characteristic of the older parts of the village. The Manor Hotel, also on the sea front, has a public bar in the main building. A little inland, on the road to Paston, is the Royal Hotel, where Lord Nelson is said to have lived for a while. There are lots of different places to stay. The Link’s and Seaward Crest chalet parks are very close and are very popular.


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