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posh crystal cabs we will transfer from any UK destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports and sea ports in the British Isles; UK SEAPORTS Southampton , Portsmouth, Dover, Harwich, Tilbury, London , Newcastle and Liverpool. we also provide local and short journeys here in Norfolk. Please Ring us on 01692 400880 or 07760777863 to get a quote just email at crystalcabs31@gmail.com ALL towns and cities and the major UK airports, such as London Gatwick airport, London Heathrow airport, London Stansted airport, London Luton airport, Manchester airport, Edinburgh airport Liverpool airport and many, many more. please allow 2 hours on top of journey AT A REASONABLE PRICE

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Aylsham eɪlʃəm or eɪlsəm is a historic market town and civil parish on the River Bure in north Norfolk, England, nearly 9 mi (14 km) north of Norwich. The river rises near Melton Constable, 11 miles (18 km) upstream from Aylsham and continues to Great Yarmouth and the North Sea, although it was only made navigable after 1779, allowing grain, coal and timber to be brought up river.
The town is close to large estates and grand country houses at Blickling, Felbrigg, Mannington and Wolterton, which are important tourist attractions.
The civil parish has an area of 4,329 acres (17.52 km and in the 2001 census had a population of 5,504 increasing to a population of 6,016 at the 2011 census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Broadland.
Archaeological evidence shows that the site of the town has been occupied since prehistoric times. Aylsham is just over two miles (3 km) from a substantial Roman settlement at Brampton, linked to Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund, south of Norwich, by a Roman road which can still be traced in places - that site was a bustling industrial centre with maritime links to the rest of the empire. Excavations in the 1970s provided evidence of several kilns, showing that this was an industrial centre, pottery and metal items being the main items manufactured.
Aylsham is thought to have been founded around 500 AD by an Anglo Saxon thegn called Aegel, Aegel's Ham, meaning Aegel's settlement". The town is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Elesham and Ailesham, with a population of about 1,000. Until the 15th century, the linen and worsted industry was important here, as well as in North Walsham and Worstead and Aylsham webb or 'cloth of Aylsham' was supplied to the royal palaces of Edward II and III.
John of Gaunt was lord of the manor from 1372 and Aylsham became the principal town of the Duchy of Lancaster. Although John of Gaunt probably never came to Aylsham, the townspeople enjoyed many privileges, including exemption from jury service outside the manor and from payment of certain taxes. The village sign depicts John of Gaunt.
In 1519 Henry VIII granted a market on Saturdays and an annual fair to be held on 12 March, which was the eve of the feast of St Gregory the pope. Aylsham markets have always been an important feature of the town, and businesses developed to meet the needs of the town and the farming lands around it. Besides weekly markets there were cattle fairs twice a year and, in October, a hiring fair.
The historic Black Boys Inn in the Market Place is one of Aylsham's oldest surviving buildings, and has been on the site since the 1650s, although the present frontage dates to between 1710 and 1720. There is a frieze of small black boys on the cornice and a good staircase and assembly room. The Black Boys was a stop for the post coach from Norwich to Cromer, had stabling for 40 horses, and employed three ostlers and four postboys.
A thatched waterpump was built in 1911 at Carr's Corner in memory of John Soame by his uncle, a wealthy financier. An artesian well 170 feet (52 m) deep, its canopy is thatched in Norfolk reed.
As with many of the other market towns in the county, the weaving of local cloth brought prosperity to the town in medieval times. Until the 15th century it was the manufacture of linen which was the more important, and Aylsham linens and Aylsham canvases were nationally known. From the 16th century linen manufacture declined and wool became more important, a situation that continued until the coming of the Industrial Revolution. Thereafter the principal trade of the town for the 19th century was grain and timber, together with the range of trades to be found in a town which supported local agriculture. Records show that Aylsham had markets and fairs, certainly from the 13th century. Such weekly and annual events were important for the trade that they brought. Annual horse fairs would bring many other traders to the town, and the weekly market would be the occasion for more local trade. The rights of the stallholders in the market place today date back to the rights established in medieval times.
Local government
In medieval times the parish of Aylsham was established as four manors, the main manor of Lancaster, Vicarage manor, Sexton's manor and Bolwick manor. The ownership of the Lancaster manor changed hands many times, before James I assigned it to his son, the future Charles I.
In the course of the events which lead up to the English Civil War Charles I had to raise as much money as possible, and mortgaged Lancaster manor to the Corporation of the City of London. The Corporation eventually sold it to Sir John Hobart, and through him it passed to the ownership of the Blickling Estate. The current lords of the manor are the National Trust.
Formerly part of the South Erpingham Hundred, Aylsham was, for administrative purposes, absorbed into St. Faith's and Aylsham Rural District Council in 1894 and became part of Broadland District Council in 1974. Local issues come under the jurisdiction of Aylsham Parish Council
he Market Place and surrounding area is dominated by the tower of the parish church of St Michael and All Angels, a fine example of Gothic architecture of the Decorated style. The small spire on top of the 98 ft (30 metre) tower is also a landmark that can be seen for miles around. The nave, aisles and chancel were built in the 13th century. The tower and ground floor of the south porch were added in the 14th century. The north transept was built under the patronage of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster around 1380. An upper floor to the porch was added in 1488. The lower part of the rood screen survived the destruction visited by Oliver Cromwell and the Puritans, although some of the painted panels were disfigured.
he Market Place and surrounding area is dominated by the tower of the parish church of St Michael and All Angels, a fine example of Gothic architecture of the Decorated style. The small spire on top of the 98 ft (30 metre) tower is also a landmark that can be seen for miles around. The nave, aisles and chancel were built in the 13th century. The tower and ground floor of the south porch were added in the 14th century. The north transept was built under the patronage of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster around 1380. An upper floor to the porch was added in 1488. The lower part of the rood screen survived the destruction visited by Oliver Cromwell and the Puritans, although some of the painted panels were disfigured.
Thomas Hudson, a glover of Aylsham, is recorded as one of the Protestant martyrs condemned to death for his faith under the reign of Queen Mary, towards the end of her reign. He was burnt at the stake at the Lollard's Pit outside Bishopsgate, Norwich on 19 May 1558.[10]
Sir Jerome Alexander (died 1670), a High Court judge in Ireland, noted for his exceptional severity, attended the local school c. 1600.
A plaque on the wall of Barclays Bank in the Market Place commemorates Christopher Layer (born 1683), who was a militant Jacobite and supporter of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the 'Young Pretender'. He was tried for high treason and hanged at Tyburn in London in 1723. Nearby, a plaque commemorates Joseph Thomas Clover (1825–82), the father of modern anaesthetics, who was born above a shop overlooking the Market Place.
Daniel Defoe stayed in Aylsham in 1732 and enjoyed a meal at the Black Boys Inn. Parson Woodforde, the famous Norfolk diarist, also dined there in 1781, and Horatio Nelson, whose cousin lived in Aylsham, is said to have danced in the Assembly Room attached to the inn
Clive Payne (1950–), former professional footballer for Norwich City and Bournemouth was born in Aylsham.
Humphry Repton (1752–1818), the landscape gardener who lived at nearby Sustead, is buried in St Michael's Churchyard, and his watercolours provide a fascinating record of the Market Place in the early 19th century.
Kathleen Starling (1890–ca 1970) became an opera singer under the name of Kathleen Destournel. She sang at Covent Garden and entertained troops in North Africa during the Second World War, before moving to Arizona, USA until her husband's death after which she returned to Aylsham to live with her sisters.
Nick Youngs (1959–) and his two sons, Ben (1989–) and Tom Youngs (1987–) were both brought up close to the town on their father's farm Youngs is a former rugby union player for Leicester and England. Both sons went on to represent the national rugby union team.

A market town in rural Norfolk, but with easy access to the North Norfolk Coast, Aylsham dates to before the Domesday Book. In the Middle Ages, the town was a centre of the cloth industry. Just two miles away is the superb stately home of Blickling Hall.

The area around Aylsham has been settled since at least the Iron Age, and we know that the Romans established a settlement at nearby Brampton. The present town of Aylsham, however, was established around AD 500 by a Saxon thegn called Aegel.

The name of the town comes from a combination of the name Aegel and 'ham', meaning settlement, so the name means Aegel's settlement. It was a very prosperous place by the time of the Domesday Book in 1086 when it is recorded as having 1,000 inhabitants.

During the Middle Ages, Aylsham was a centre of cloth production, and the town's weavers supplied cloth to the royal households of Edward II and Edward III. The prosperity of the town was enhanced even more when John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, became Lord of the Manor on 1382 and made Aylsham the main administrative centre for the Duchy of Lancaster.

The Duke's place in the town's history is preserved in the town sign, depicting him riding on horseback. Henry VIII granted Aylsham the right to hold an annual fair and a weekly market.

ST MICHAEL'S CHURCH

The parish church of St Michael is worth a visit. It dates to the 13th century and is an excellent example of the Decorated Gothic style, with some attractive memorial brasses. The north transept was built under the patronage of John of Gaunt, though it seems unlikely that the Duke ever actually visited Aylsham in person.

Surprisingly, the lower section of the painted medieval rood screen survived the destruction wrought by Puritans in the 17th century, though some of the painted figures were damaged. The famous landscape gardener and architect Humphrey Repton is buried in the churchyard.

Abbot's Hall in Aylsham is a late 17th-century building built on the foundations of a medieval house built by the abbey of Bury St Edmunds. Another historic building is the Black Boys Inn on the Market Place. The facade of the Inn dates from around 1710, but behind that facade is a much older building, erected in the 1650s, making the Inn the oldest building in Aylsham save for the church.

Another interesting historic structure is a thatched water pump at Carr's Corner. The water pump itself dates 'only' to 1910. On Cawston Road stand the remains of an early 19th-century tower mill, standing 7 storeys high, though the sails and cap have now gone.

The most popular historic attraction in the area is Blicking Hall, a Jacobean masterpiece of a stately home built for Sir Henry Hobart by architect Robert Lyminge and set in a beautiful 18th-century landscape garden.


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