EXPERIENCE NORTH WALSHAM  | POSH CRYSTAL CABS

YOU CAN TRUST NORTH WALSHAM  | POSH CRYSTAL CABS

When you are in need of a Cab in the North Walsham area, look no further than the experts at Crystal Cabs in North Walsham area We do Local runs taxi service with competitive rates to help you get you to your destination. Whether you want a lift to the shops, or a lift home at 3 in the morning, we can help you out.
We will transfer from any UK destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports in the British Isles; we also provide local and short journeys here in North Norfolk.
All our drivers have excellent knowledge of North Norfolk and surrounding areas, also all drivers have gone through vigorous police checks and have CRB certificates to obtain their hackney carriage badges from N.N.D.C .Email crystalcabs31@gmail.com
we also provide local and short journeys here in North Norfolk. Please Ring us on 01692 400880

airport trancfers

  AIRPORT TRANCFERS

Posh crystal cabs 

 Airport trancfers will transfer you  from any UK Airport destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations London Liverpool Manchester Birmingham airports & Seaports in the British Isles; we also provide local Runs and short journeys here in Norfolk.All our drivers have excellent knowledge of North Norfolk and surrounding areas, also all drivers have gone through vigorous police checks and have CRB certificates to obtain their hackney carriage badges from N.N.D.C (north norfolk district council) to drive their cabs.  Emailcrystalcabs31@gmail.com posh crystal cabs can provide transfers from your home or business to any airport in the uk


             OUR SERVICE

Established in 2009, Posh crystal cabs North Walsham and Aylsham  is a company based in  North Walsham, Norfolk. We offer a 24 hour service to all major UK Airports, Seaports.We provied Local runs covering

North Walsham Aylsham Norwich Cromer Wroxham Holt Gt Yarmouth Mundesley Bacton

AIR CONDITIONED TRAVEL

ALL DRIVERS FULLY VETTED BY DBS AND ARE LICENSED BY NORTH NORFOLK COUNCIL

posh crystal cabs we will transfer from any UK destination

in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports and sea ports in the British Isles; we also take on local and short journeys here in North Norfolk. Please Ring us on 01692 400880 or 07760777863 please allow 2 hours on top of journey AT A REASONABLE PRICE Local runs

North Walsham Aylsham Norwich Cromer Wroxham Holt Gt Yarmouth Mundesley Bacton Area

When you are in need of a Cab in the North Walsham area, look no further than the experts at Crystal Cabs in North Walsham area We provide Local runs a taxi service with competitive rates

 

north walsham taxis
seaports

     Seaport Transfers


posh crystal cabs we will transfer from any UK destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports and sea ports in the British Isles; UK SEAPORTS Southampton , Portsmouth, Dover, Harwich, Tilbury, London , Newcastle and Liverpool. we also provide local and short journeys here in Norfolk. Please Ring us on 01692 400880 or 07760777863 to get a quote just email at crystalcabs31@gmail.com ALL towns and cities and the major UK airports, such as London Gatwick airport, London Heathrow airport, London Stansted airport, London Luton airport, Manchester airport, Edinburgh airport Liverpool airport and many, many more. please allow 2 hours on top of journey AT A REASONABLE PRICE

 

                            Seaport Transfers

posh crystal cabs we will transfer from any UK destination to any UK destination in England, Scotland and Wales, covering all UK destinations & airports and sea ports in the British Isles; UK SEAPORTS Southampton , Portsmouth, Dover, Harwich, Tilbury, London , Newcastle and Liverpool. we also provide local and short journeys here in Norfolk. Please Ring us on 01692 400880 or 07760777863  ALL towns and cities and the major UK airports, such as London Gatwick airport, London Heathrow airport, London Stansted airport, London Luton airport, Manchester airport, Edinburgh airport Liverpool airport and many, many more. please allow 2 hours on top of journey AT A REASONABLE PRICE

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KINGS HEAD
the bucks arms
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Feathers
aylsham 5
Unicorn
airport trancfers
north walsham
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STALHAM
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LIVERPOOL airport
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Aylsham ex servie

Georgie Fame - Get Away

Them - Here Comes The Night

Danny Williams..Moon River

Frank Sinatra -- High Hopes

Bristol Harbour is the harbour in the city of Bristol, England. The harbour covers an area of 70 acres (28.3 ha). It has existed since the 13th century but was developed into its current form in the early 19th century by installing lock gates on a tidal stretch of the River Avon in the centre of the city and providing a tidal by-pass for the river. It is often called the Floating Harbour as the water level remains constant and it is not affected by the state of the tide on the river.

Netham Lock in east Bristol is the upstream limit of the harbour. Beyond the lock is a junction: on one arm the navigable River Avon continues upstream to Bath, and on the other arm is the tidal River Avon. The first 1 mile (1.6 km) of the floating harbour, downstream from Netham Lock to Totterdown Basin, is an artificial canal known as the Feeder Canal, while the tidal River Avon follows its original route. Downstream of Totterdown Basin, the floating harbour occupies the former natural course of the River Avon, whilst the tidal River Avon flows through an artificial channel known as the New Cut. This separation of the floating harbour and the tidal River Avon allows boats in the harbour to remain floating at low tide, reduces currents and silting and prevents flooding.                                                                                                 

Between Bristol Temple Meads railway station and Hotwells, the harbour and the River Avon run parallel at a distance of no more than 0.65 miles (1.0 km) apart. Downstream of Bristol Temple Meads railway station, the floating harbour meanders through Bristol city centre, Canon's Marsh and Hotwells. At Hotwells, the floating harbour rejoins the tidal River Avon, via a series of locks, and flows into the Avon Gorge.

Bristol Harbour was the original Port of Bristol, but as ships and their cargo have increased in size, it has now largely been replaced by docks at Avonmouth and Portbury. These are located 7 miles (11.3 km) downstream at the mouth of the River Avon.Bristol grew up on the banks of the Rivers Avon and Frome. Since the 13th century, the rivers have been modified for use as docks including the diversion of the River Frome in the 1240s into an artificial deep channel known as "Saint Augustine's Reach", which flowed into the River Avon. Saint Augustine's Reach became the heart of Bristol's docks with its quays and wharfs. The River Avon within the gorge, and the River Severn into which it flows, has tides which fluctuate about 30 feet (9 m) between high and low water. This means that the river is easily navigable at high-tide but reduced to a muddy channel at low tide in which ships would often run aground. Ships had no option but to be stranded in the harbour for unloading, giving rise to the phrase "shipshape and Bristol fashion" to describe how ships and their secured cargo were capable of taking the strain of repeated strandings on the mud.A tall ship in the Cumberland lock, Hotwells, during the 2004 Harbour Festival.
As early as 1420, vessels from Bristol were regularly travelling to Iceland and it is speculated that sailors from Bristol had made landfall in the Americas before Christopher Columbus or John Cabot. After Cabot arrived in Bristol, he proposed a scheme to the king, Henry VII, in which he proposed to reach Asia by sailing west across the north Atlantic. He estimated that this would be shorter and quicker than Columbus' southerly route. The merchants of Bristol, operating under the name of the Society of Merchant Venturers, agreed to support his scheme. They had sponsored probes into the north Atlantic from the early 1480s, looking for possible trading opportunities In 1552 Edward VI granted a Royal Charter to the Merchant Venturers to manage the port

By 1670, the city had 6,000 tons of shipping, of which half was used for importing tobacco. By the late 17th century and early 18th century, this shipping was also playing a significant role in the slave trade.

Construction of the floating harbour

The Cumberland Basin
In the 18th century, the docks in Liverpool grew larger and so increased competition with Bristol for the tobacco trade. Coastal trade was also important, with the area called "Welsh Back" concentrating on trows with cargoes from the slate industry in Wales, stone, timber and coal The limitations of Bristol's docks were causing problems to business, so in 1802 William Jessop proposed installing a dam and lock at Hotwells to create the harbour. The £530,000 scheme was approved by Parliament, and construction began in May 1804. The scheme included the construction of the Cumberland Basin, a large wide stretch of the harbour in Hotwells where the Quay walls and bollards have listed building status.


Launch of the SS Great Britain, the revolutionary ship of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, at Bristol in 1843
The tidal new cut was constructed from Netham to Hotwells, with another dam installed at this end of the harbour. The Feeder Canal between Temple Meads and Netham provided a link to the tidal river so that boats could continue upstream to Bath. However, the new scheme required a way to equalise the levels inside and outside the Dock for the passage of vessels to and from the Avon, and bridges to cross the water. Jessop built Cumberland Basin with two entrance locks from the tidal Avon, of width 45 ft (13.7 m) and 35 ft (10.7 m), and a 45 feet (13.7 m) wide junction lock between the Basin and what became known as the Floating Harbour. This arrangement provided flexibility of operation with the Basin being used as a lock when there were large numbers of arrivals and sailings. The harbour was officially opened on 1 May 1809.


SS Great Britain.
Patterson's yard within the harbour was used for the construction of many ships notably Brunel's SS Great Western in 1838 and the SS Great Britain in 1843. They were some of the largest ships to have been built at the time, and ironically hastened the decline of the city docks by proving the feasibility of large ships. The SS Great Britain was to be towed away from her builders, to have her 1,000 hp engines and interior fitted out on the River Thames, but her 48 ft (14.6 m) beam was too big to pass through the lock. Thus the SS Great Britain was moored in the Floating Harbour until December 1844, before proceeding into Cumberland Basin after coping stones and lock gate platforms were removed from the Junction Lock.[9] At one time there were dozens of Bristol shipyards, the largest in the harbour being Hilhouse, who became Charles Hill & Sons in 1845.

19th century improvements
The harbour cost more than anticipated and high rates were levied to repay loans, reducing any benefit the new harbour had at drawing companies back from Liverpool. In 1848 the city council bought the docks company to force down the rates. They employed Isambard Kingdom Brunel to make improvements, including new lock gates, a dredger and sluice gates designed to reduce siltation.

By 1867, ships were getting larger and the meanders in the river Avon prevented vessels over 300 ft (91 m) from reaching the harbour. A scheme to install a much larger lock at Avonmouth to make the entire river a floating harbour, and to straighten the sharper bends, was dropped after work began on the much cheaper docks at Avonmouth and Portishead. The present entrance lock was designed by Thomas Howard and opened in July 1873. This has a width of 62 ft (18.9 m) and is the only entrance lock now in use at the City Docks.

From 1893 until 1934 the Clifton Rocks Railway provided an underground funicular railway link from the western end of the harbour, which is close to the locks,

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